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How to change your account name

The wedding and the honeymoon are over, and you are settling into life as a married person. Now that it is official, you can completely merge your life with your new spouse. That means moving in together if you have not already, deciding whether or not to combine your bank accounts and—if you have chosen to do so—changing your last name to your spouse’s

Luckily, changing your last name is one of the easiest aspects of getting married. All that is required is some paperwork and your time, according to www.thebalance.com.

If you received wedding presents in the form of cheque written out to a name that does not yet (or might not ever) exist, see tips at the end of this article. You might not have to wait until your name is officially changed to deposit cheques.

How to change your name after marriage

Gather documents: Before getting married, you applied for a marriage license. The licence should have been given to you and the witnesses who signed the license (usually at the wedding). Once signed, you should receive an official copy of your marriage certificate.

Update your driver’s licence: To get a new driver’s licence, you need to go to the government office in charge with the correct paperwork in hand—including your marriage certificate and your old driver’s licence While there, ask about changing the name on the title of your car and your vehicle registration records.

Update financial accounts: Once you have received your new driver’s licence, you can now update all of your financial records—including bank accounts, retirement accounts, credit cards, and more. You can typically do this in person with your bank. Ask your bank what documents are required—typically you would submit a copy of the marriage certificate and a letter requesting the change to your new name. Be prepared to sign the form twice, using your old “formerly known as” name as well as your new name. In some cases, financial institutions provide a form to guide you through the process. Remember to request new cheques in your new name if you rely on checks regularly.

Notify other service providers and agencies: Most of your other records can be updated online or by phone. Among others, be sure to update your car insurance, utility bills, passport, doctor’s records, and other necessary office information. You can also update this information as it comes. For example, instead of updating all of your bills at once, update them as they come in. That approach makes it slightly less stressful than trying to remember each and every little detail of your life. Eventually, all of your documents will reflect your new last name.

Changing your name should be one of your first priorities once you are back from your honeymoon. While it can seem like a daunting task, break it down into baby steps and make it a goal to complete one step each week until everything is finalised.

Time is of the essence?

After making your marriage official, you might be tempted to take a breather from all the paperwork. But it is really best to update your financial accounts as soon as possible. Life will only continue to speed up for you—there will never be a convenient time to do this. When you go through other life changes (such as job changes, moving, and other events that demand your time and energy), you will appreciate having account names that match. It is much easier to make those critical deposits and withdrawals if everything is tidy.

Checks to the bride and groom might be an exception. Your loved ones, while well-intentioned, likely wrote cheques in a variety of different ways, possibly making assumptions about if and how you would change your surname. On the bright side, at least they wrote you a cheque instead of buying a toaster.

If you are staring at a pile of cheques with mismatched names and wondering if you would ever get to deposit them, take the cheques (and your spouse) to the bank. Bring a copy of your marriage certificate, and explain the situation. In many cases, bank staff will allow these one-off deposits—just ask how exactly to endorse the cheques.

The long-term solution is to get your accounts properly registered and get everybody familiar with your correct name. You don’t want to go to the branch every time you get a cheque.

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